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Reptiles + Pet Services

  • Allopurinol is an oral medication typically used to prevent uric acid and calcium oxalate stones in dogs. It is also used off-label to treat leishmaniasis and gout in dogs and other species. Side effects are uncommon but may involve stomach upset. Caution must be taken when allopurinol is used in conjunction with certain other medications. It should not be used in pets with liver or kidney dysfunction or in red-tailed hawks.

  • Many reptile owners are surprised to learn that all pets, including reptiles, need at least annual checkups. A number of reptile veterinarians actually recommend checkups at least twice a year. Depending upon the species of reptile, the testing performed, and the temperament of your pet, some of these tests may require short-acting sedatives or gas anesthesia to minimize an animal’s stress level. Every visit starts with a thorough physical examination, during which your veterinarian will record your pet's weight, general appearance, and activity level. Your veterinarian will also ask you about your pet’s recent history and evaluate its diet. Just as your own regular medical visit includes blood testing, so does a checkup for a reptile. Microscopic examination of the feces allows detection of internal parasites. Using X-rays, your veterinarian can examine your pet's body for abnormalities in the size, shape, and position of body organs, screen for masses such as tumors, look for abnormal fluid accumulation, and check the bones and joints.

  • If they are well looked after, including proper diet and husbandry, bearded dragons are reasonably hardy animals. Common health conditions of pet bearded dragons include CANV, atadenovirus, metabolic bone disease, parasites, infectious stomatitis (mouth rot), and respiratory infections. Any change from normal is cause for concern and should be immediately evaluated by your veterinarian.

  • The bearded dragon is a very popular small to medium-sized pet lizard. Bearded dragons are omnivorous, meaning they eat both plant and animal-based foods, including insects. They should consume a diet that is 50% insects and 50% green leafy vegetables. This handout is a general guide for feeding pet bearded dragons a nutritious and balanced diet.

  • Bearded dragons have specific environmental requirements to thrive as our pets. This handout outlines their housing needs, including enclosure size, appropriate bedding, preferred accessories, and necessary lighting and temperature control.

  • Bearded dragons are well-known small to medium-sized lizards. They are currently considered one of the most popular pet lizards for all ages. Owners often refer to their pets as 'beardies'. This handout explains how they differ from other pets and provides tips for selecting a healthy beardie to keep as your pet.

  • Bearded dragons are susceptible to several health problems; understanding them will help you prevent them from occurring in your pet and know when to seek veterinary attention. Problems described in this handout include salmonellosis, avascular necrosis, tail rot, abscesses, and dystocia (egg binging).

  • Box turtles can be very fairly easy to care for type of turtle. It needs to be mentioned that there are several medical conditions that are known with box turtle ownership. Every box turtle owner should be aware that any swelling, change in energy level or food intake needs veterinary attention relatively soon.

  • Before acquiring a reptile, thoroughly research all aspects of reptile ownership including not only which reptile is appropriate for your lifestyle, but also how to provide it with proper diet, suitable housing, and a healthy, stimulating environment. As a rule, if you want a pet to snuggle with, a reptile is not for you! If, on the other hand, you want an animal you can display in a well-designed, natural habitat, marvel in its natural behaviors, and enjoy learning about it, owning a reptile might be for you. Most reptiles must be fed and watered daily, and often their cages need to be cleaned daily as well. All reptiles need to be examined by a reptile-savvy veterinarian immediately after purchase or adoption (within 48 hours), and then at least annually after that. Since many exotic animals are prey species that hide illness to avoid being captured by predators, these pets usually do not act sick (or show any indication of illness) until they are very sick and need immediate veterinary attention. Regular veterinary care, plus an informed, knowledgeable pet owner, greatly reduces the likelihood of illness and death in these pets.

  • Turtles commonly suffer from vitamin A deficiency, respiratory diseases, abscesses, shell infections, shell fractures, and parasites. Vitamin A deficiency (hypovitaminosis A) occurs as a result of feeding turtles an inappropriate diet. Symptoms include a lack of appetite, lethargy, swelling of the eyelids, swelling of the ear, kidney failure, and respiratory infections. Respiratory tract infections are most often caused by bacteria. Abscesses are treated surgically and may also require antibiotics. Shell infections can be challenging to treat. Gastrointestinal parasites are treated with appropriate deworming medications. Seek immediate veterinary care if there is any deviation from normal in your aquatic turtle.

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